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All About the Sun

Objectives:

  • The students will learn about the Sun.

  • The students will be able to describe the Sun’s characteristics.

  • The students will be able to explain why we have night and day.

  • The students will be able to explain the Sun’s importance to Earth.

Questions that encompasses the objective:

  • Think about the Sun. What importance does the Sun have?

  • What do you think it would be like on Earth if the Sun did not exist?     

Prepare the Learner: Activating Prior Knowledge. 

How will students prior knowledge be activated?

Warm up by asking students:

  • What do you know about the Sun?

Common Core State Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1 B

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.4

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.2

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2 B

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.4

Materials and Free Resources to Download for this Lesson: 

  • Introductory Activity: “Will It Melt in the Sun?”

    • Cupcake Tin (one with individual spots)

    • Crayon

    • Piece of Chocolate

    • Ice Cube

    • Block

    • Eraser

    • Rock

    • “Will It Melt in the Sun?” Prediction Worksheet

Adapted from: Frugal Fun For Girls and Boys - Simple Science Experiment for Kids: What Melts in the Sun?

Adapted From: Simply Second Grade "The Sun and Moon"

**When the unit is over, download the final assessment for all of the lessons on space for free.

**Here's the answer key.**

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Input:
What is the most important content in this lesson?
To reach this lesson’s objective, students need to understand:

  • The characteristics of the Sun (including diameter).

  • The reason for night and day

  • The Sun’s importance to the Earth.

  • The internal structure of the Sun.

  • The Sun’s distance from Earth.

How will the learning of this content be facilitated?

  • The teacher should begin class by conducting the experiment “Will It Melt in the Sun?”. The teacher should give each student a “Will It Melt in the Sun?” prediction worksheet. If possible, the teacher should gather all the students around a table to conduct the experiment as a class. The teacher should show the students the cupcake tin and the items. The teacher should pick up one item, have the students identify the item, and then place it in one of the cupcake tin sections. Once all the items have been placed in the tin, the teacher should have the students return to their desks and fill out their prediction worksheet. The teacher should allow the students about 3 minutes to fill out their worksheet. After the worksheets have been completed, the teacher should place the tin on a windowsill/ somewhere where the sun will shine on it. After the material is presented (at the end of class), the teacher and students will see if their predictions were correct.

  • After the experiment is done, the teacher will begin presenting the information on the Solar System. If it is possible, project each page of the teacher’s copy of the “All About the Solar System” Science Journal worksheet onto the board using a projector or put into a PowerPoint document and project.  The teacher’s copy of the journal has certain words/phrases that are bolded red and highlighted. It is important the teacher explain to the students those words/phrases are to be highlighted in their (students) journal. For this lesson, the teacher should review these pages:

  • Pages 41: Sun Facts

** This page reviews basic information about the Sun, including diameter, distance from the Earth, and age**

  • Pages 42-43: One Giant Star: The Sun

**This page reviews how the Sun was formed and its importance in the Solar System. To explain the internal structure of the Sun, visit this web page called "The Sun" by Pass My Exams.co.uk**

  • Page 44: What Makes Night and Day?

**This page reviews why we have night and day. The teacher should show the video: “Day and Night Explanation, Causes, Science for Kids-ACADEMIA Outstanding English Medium School” by ACADEMIA SCHOOL DHAKA

  • After the game, the students will create a “The Sun Is…” craft. Each student will get three yellow pieces of cardstock or construction paper. If the teacher prefers a larger craft, poster board should be used; each student will get one poster board. The students will cut out a circle and 10 stripes. In the center of the circle, the students will write, “The Sun Is…” On each strip, the students will write one sun fact, continuing the sentence “The Sun Is…” (for example: “a star”). Once the students have all the strips completed, they will glue them onto circle (so it looks like a sun). Allow the students about 15 minutes to complete the activity.  

Closure

  • For the closure, the teacher should return to the introductory experiment, “Will It Melt in the Sun?” The teacher should take the tin and place it on a table; the students should have the students stand around the table. The teacher and students should examine the objects and see if their predictions were correct.

Time/Application
3-5 minutes
Guided Introduction

Review the class/ agenda with the students:

  • Introductory Experiment: “Will It Melt in the Sun?”

  • Discussion: Science Journal (Pages 41-44)

  • Activity: “What Planet am I On?”

  • Discussion of Activity

10 minutes

Introductory Experiment: “Will It Melt in the Sun?”

  • Give each student a “Will It Melt in the Sun?” worksheet.

  • Gather all the students around a table to conduct the experiment as a class.

  • Show the students the cupcake tin and the items.

  • Pick up one item, have the students identify the item, and then place it in one of the cupcake tin sections.

  • Once all of the items have been placed in the tin, should have the students return to their desks and fill out their prediction worksheet.

  • Place the tin on a windowsill/somewhere where the Sun will shine on it.

20 Minutes

Sun Facts | One Giant Star | Night and Day

  • Instruct the students to open to page 41 in their science journals.

  • Project each page of the science journal onto the board either through a projector or PowerPoint presentation.

  • The teacher copy has bolded red and highlighted words. The students will highlight those words in their science journal.

  • Begin presenting the information. The pages that will be presented include: pages 41-44.

15 Minutes

Activity: “The Sun Is…”

  • Give each student two pieces of construction paper or cardstock. If using poster board, each student should only get one piece.

  • Instruct the students to cut out a circle and 10 stripes.

  • Instruct the students to write, “The Sun Is…” in the center of the circle. On each strip, the students will write one sun fact, continuing the sentence “The Sun Is…” (for example: “a star”).

  • After the students finish the strips, have them glue the strips onto the back of the circle (so it looks like a sun).

  • Allow the students about 15 minutes to complete the activity.

  • Reconvene and review when the students are finished.

Closure/Assessment
10 minutes

  • For the closure, the teacher should return to the introductory experiment, “Will It Melt in the Sun?”. The teacher should take the tin and place it on a table; the students should have the students stand around the table. The teacher and students should examine the objects and see if their predictions were correct.


Individualized Instruction/Scaffolding

English Language Learners will be supported in this lesson through data-based heterogeneous grouping, verbal and written repetition of new vocabulary words, and multiple representation of vocabulary words through printed images and video.