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How Does Liquid Water Turn Into Gas? A Lesson Plan about Evaporation

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Objectives:

  • The students will be able to understand that when liquid water gets hot enough, it will turn into a gas in a process called evaporation.

  • The students will be able to explain how temperature influences the rate of evaporation.

  • The students will conduct an experiment that shows the process of evaporation.

Questions that encompasses the objective:

  • Think about rain. After it rains and the sun comes out, what happens to the puddles/water on the ground?

  • Where does the water go when it dries up?    

Prepare the Learner: Activating Prior Knowledge. 

How will students prior knowledge be activated?

Warm up by asking students:

  • What do you know about evaporation?

Common Core State Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1 B

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.4

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.2

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2 B

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.4

Materials and Free Resources to Download for this Lesson: 

Unit Resources:

Input:
What is the most important content in this lesson?
To reach this lesson’s objective, students need to understand:

  • The definitions to the terms: evaporation and condensation.

  • The process of evaporation.

  • How the temperature influences the rate of evaporation.

How will the learning of this content be facilitated?

  • The teacher should begin class by inviting all of the students to stand around a table. The teacher should show the students the plastic cup and cup of water. Starting at the cup, the teacher should draw three horizontal lines (one underneath the other, about ½ inch apart). The teacher should explain to the students that today they will be doing an experiment about evaporation. The teacher should pour the water into the cup and then place the cup on a window ledge or some place that is in direct sunlight. The teacher should give each student a “What Will Happen to the Water?” worksheet and instruct them to go back to their seats. The teacher should allow the students about 5 minutes to complete the worksheet, predicting what they think will happen to the water by the end of class. Once the students are done, the teacher should review some of the responses. The responses should be recorded on the blackboard or chart paper. At the end of class, the teacher and students will revisit this experiment.

  • After the activity discussion is done, the teacher will begin presenting the information on weather. If it is possible, project each page of the teacher’s copy of the “All About Weather” Science Journal worksheet onto the board using a projector or put into a PowerPoint document and project.  The teacher’s copy of the journal has certain words/phrases that are bolded red and highlighted. It is important the teacher explain to the students those words/phrases are to be highlighted in their (students) journal. For this lesson, the teacher should review these pages:

  • Page 16: The Water Cycle

** This page reviews the water cycle**

Optional Video: Water: Water Cycle, Forms of Water and Water Conservation- Something Fishy: Kids Lesson 1” (Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTkFHO2-jsc&t=231s ) This video can be used to clarify the water cycle to the students**

  • Pages 17-18: Evaporation and Condensation

**This page reviews evaporation and condensation and the roles each plays in terms of weather**

  • Pages 19: Rain, Dew, and Fog: What is the Difference?

**This page reviews the differences between rain, dew, and fog**

  • After the information has been presented, the teacher should show the video YouTube Video: “Eureka 18- Evaporation and Condensation” by Sheila Tjapkes. The video, which is about 5 minutes long, is a cartoon that explain evaporation and condensation. Before starting the video, the teacher should hand out the “Did You Know?” worksheet. The students need to write down three facts that they learned from the video. After the video is over, the teacher should begin a discussion about the content. Any misconceptions about the content presented should be cleared up at this point.

  • Closure

    • For the closure, the teacher should revisit the experiment from the beginning of class. Again, the teacher should gather the students around the table and place the plastic cup in the center. The teacher and the students should observe the cup and see at which line the water is at. The teacher and students should discuss the predictions that were made at the beginning of class.

    • Finally, the students should answer work on the worksheet “What Happened To the Water?”

Time/Application
3-5 minutes
Guided Introduction

Review the class/ agenda with the students:

15 minutes

Introductory Experiment: “Evaporation”

  • Invite the students to stand around the table.

  • Show the students the plastic cup and water.

  • Pour the water into the cup and place it on a window ledge/ place in direct sunlight.

  • Give each student a “What Will Happen to the Water?” worksheet.

  • Instruct the students to complete the worksheet with their predictions.

  • Review the predictions when the students are done. Write some of them on the blackboard/chart paper.

15 Minutes

Water Cycle | Evaporation and Condensation | Rain, Dew, & Fog

  • Instruct the students to open to page 16 in their science journals.

  • Project each page of the science journal onto the board either through a projector or PowerPoint presentation.

  • The teacher copy has bolded red and highlighted words. The students will highlight those words in their science journal.

  • Begin presenting the information. The pages that will be presented include: pages 16-19.

15 Minutes

Video: “Eureka 18- Evaporation and Condensation”

  • Instruct the students to fill out the worksheet, writing three interesting facts they learned by watching the video.

  • After the video, review the worksheet with the students.

10 minutes

Closure

  • For the closure, the teacher should revisit the experiment from the beginning of class. Again, the teacher should gather the students around the table and place the plastic cup in the center. The teacher and the students should observe the cup and see at which line the water is at. The teacher and students should discuss the predictions that were made at the beginning of class.

  • Finally, the students should answer work on the worksheet “What Happened To the Water?”


Individualized Instruction/Scaffolding

English Language Learners will be supported in this lesson through data-based heterogeneous grouping, verbal and written repetition of new vocabulary words, and multiple representation of vocabulary words through printed images and video.

Ecosystems, Biomes, and Habitats PowerPoint and Activities